Best Mountaineering Boots

First of all, the Best Mountaineering Boots are essential for significant mountaineering. Gear not only the energy of mountaineer but also play a substantial role. Moreover, Best Mountaineering Boots provide support and strength while carrying loads. Besides, allow firm grip in rough surface especially over very slick rock, snow, and keep feet warm in low temperatures.

Furthermore, all mountaineering activities have threads and difficult conditions. Consequently, in hard and unpredictable conditions like winter hiking, Best Mountaineering Boots are appropriate. Indeed, you need well-built and robust Best Mountaineering Boots.

Qualities of Best Mountaineering Boots

A general rule for Best Mountaineering Boots selection is to check size. But not the only size matters for the perfect Best Mountaineering Boots. Also, other parameters do affect. For example, the below settings are helpful to select the Best Mountaineering Boots for a mountaineer.

Fitting of boot

Improper fitting in shoes can result in stress and fracture. Also, callous, bunion and more. Before buying boots measure your feet, so you can avoid improper fitting.

Insulation

Non-insulated Best Mountaineering Boots are less warm than insulated one this is one of the critical parameters in mountaineer boot.

Best mounting boot of 2018

Flexibility

Flexible boot allows you to feel more comfortable. Keep in view this parameter before ordering.

La Sportiva Olympus Mons

Classification: Extreme cold/high altitude
Color: Multiple

The La Sportiva Olympus Mons is among the most popular Best Mountaineering Boots on the market for extreme cold. It’s the go-to model for mountaineers looking to stay warm in high places such as K2, Karakorum, Mount Everest, and Antarctica’s Mount Vinson.

Moreover, the uber-comfortable polyurethane thermal-insulated inner boot covers a wide range of foot sizes. And the one-handed lacing system with a Velcro closure doesn’t require any tying. This option is perfect for tightening with big gloves or even mittens. A similar system tightens up the outer-boot. Also, a durable zipper and Velcro strap seal off your feet from the frozen elements of the world’s biggest mountains.

There is a downside of the La Sportiva Olympus Mons. It seems like the unique insulating Vibram PE sole achieves a notable amount of underfoot warmth. Nonetheless, this is the softest rubber of any double boot on the market.

Crampons

The boot wears consistently with crampons. Maybe you do a lot of walking on sharp rocks without crampons. In that case, you will notice quicker wear on the boot. Think Aconcagua, for example.

Full Strength Ruber Sole

La Sportiva does address this issue by having a full-strength rubber toe. So for most snow and ice mountains like Denali, durability is not an issue.

A Bit Heavy

Also, the Oly Mons is a bit heavier than the Scarpa 8000. It is below 5 pounds 12.4 ounces per pair although the difference is minor. Regarding fit, many people recommend going up at least one full size.

Scarpa Phantom 6000

Classification: 4-season technical alpine
Color: Multiple

The Scarpa Phantom 6000 offers the best performance, construction, and feel. This model is Scarpa’s go-to model for giant ice routes in the Canadian Rockies and technical Alaska ascents. And we feel confident in saying that it’s also an excellent option for many mid-season Denali climbers. Scarpa’s Phantom 8000 is even warmer but significantly heavier.

At only 4 pounds 6 ounces for the pair (size 42), the Phantom 6000 is the lightest in its class—a hair more luminous than the La Sportiva G2 SM. And more than 1 pound lighter than La Sportiva’s industrial machine, the Spantik.

Regarding construction, a PrimaLoftMicropile insulated liner provides ample padding and warmth, with an essential Velcro closure on the outer side. Scarpa shaved weight from the previous orange Phantom 6000 by replacing the rubber rand with a molded foam rand, which likely will not be as durable in the long run.

Scarpa Phantom 6000

More, the wrap-around zipper concept can feel weird at first. But we appreciate the fact that this design almost entirely protects the zipper from being scuffed by the passing point of a crampon.

We found the heel pocket to be a little broad on the Phantom 6000, although a pair of thick socks helps to tune in the fit. And unfortunately, this boot only comes in full sizes. Although Scarpa’s footwear is known for being more extensive than La Sportiva’s, we felt that these Best Mountaineering Boots fit very similar to the La Sportiva G2 SM.

ScarpaCharmoz

Classification: Lightweight mountaineering
Color: Multiple

The ScarpaCharmoz is the go-to option when you need one piece of footwear to get you from the car to the summit. From long approaches through tree line to crossing glacier-polished granite slabs and up icy summit pyramids, the Charmoz will keep your feet dry and agile.

It is decidedly a three-season boot—the light insulation, quasi-flexible sole. And great rocker means that the Charmoz is not an ideal choice for technical ice climbing or mountaineering in cold conditions. But for spring and fall weekend missions into the Cascades, Bugaboos, Rockies, or Sierra, it is an excellent boot.

At just over 3 pounds for the pair, the Charmoz is slightly more substantial than the La Sportiva Trango Cube GTX but feels a little more durable. And at only $300, the Charmoz is almost $100 cheaper than the Trango Cube, although it does utilize an OutDry waterproof liner instead of a more proven Gore-Tex insert.

ScarpaCharmoz

As with many Best Mountaineering Boots in this weight class, the lack of a toe welt means that the Charmoz will not take step-in crampons, although it is compatible with semi-automatic crampons.

On a recent climbing trip to Nepal, our tester was very satisfied with how well the Charmoz hiked on trails and kicked up screen on a 5,200-meter pass. If covering miles and vertical versatility are what you are looking for, this is our favorite lightweight boot.

Arc’teryxAcrux AR

Classification: 4-season technical alpine
Color: Multiple

When Arc’teryx designs something, they typically go bold. And the Acrux AR mountaineering boot is no exception. Sleek and black with just a slight hint of red, the Acrux AR looks like it could kick a mountain to pieces and come away without a scratch—of all the options on this list, it may be the most durable.

The Acrux AR has very few seams, which are known to be points of weakness in Best Mountaineering Boots. A fully waterproof zipper protects the Gore-Tex lined inner boot, which resembles a thick and stretchy sock.

We were somewhat surprised by the simple lace design. A pull-down cinch design would be beautiful. But a lateral Velcro strap provides some additional stiffness above the ankle.

Arc’teryxAcrux AR

Regarding best uses, the Acrux AR will excel at everything from ice climbing in the Canadian Rockies to alpine-style ascents of lower mountains in the Alaska Range. Although Arc’teryx calls the Acrux AR a double boot, it’s less so than the Scarpa 6000 or La SportivaSpantik. This boot is closer in warmth, weight.

And technicality to the La Sportiva G5 and Scarpa Phantom Tech. We also found the Acrux AR has a narrower fit than the G5. Overall, if the Acrux AR fits your foot and price range, we feel confident that this stealth boot will propel you across vast glaciers, up steep drips, and onto many remote summits.

La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX

Classification: 4-season technical alpine
Color: Multiple

La Sportiva’s Nepal line has been the standard bearer for technical single Best Mountaineering Boots for nearly two decades. There have been several iterations over the years, but the concept has mainly stayed the same. It is a durable leather boot that excels across the spectrum of mountaineering.

These Best Mountaineering Boots have kept guides’ feet warm on Mount Rainer, are more than sufficient for all but the coldest days of picking up dry ice in the northeast. And should perform just fine on late April and May trips to the lower peaks in the Alaska Range.

You can even bust out a few rock moves when needed thanks to the rubber toe. And La Sportiva upped the ante on their Nepal line when they introduced the Nepal Cube GTX.

Coming in more than 8 ounces lighter than the Nepal EVO for the pair, the Cube GTX still retains its predecessor’s technicality and jack of all trades prowess. La Sportiva stripped the Nepal EVO’s more massive construction in places like the Vibram rubber rand, adding an air-injected rubber rand instead.

La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX

While this does indeed lighten the boot, it also reduces durability slightly. One of our favorite features is the removable tongue, which can be moved up or down (or even removed entirely) to add padding and or make more space.

If durability or cost is your most important consideration, we would instead recommend the La Sportiva Nepal EVO ($510, 4 pounds 7.4 ounces), Scarpa Mont Blanc Pro GTX ($500, 4 pounds 0 ounces) or Lowa Weisshorn ($490, 4 pounds 4.6 ounces). Otherwise, the Nepal Cube GTX will give you the warmth and support you need with less weight.

Scarpa Phantom Tech

Classification: 4-season technical alpine
Color: Multiple

Scarpa’s entire Phantom line looks so similar that it can be hard to tell the Tech apart from the 6000 and 8000. In sum, the Tech is the racecar of the Phantom line and one of the most popular Best Mountaineering Boots among ice climbing guides. Given how light it is at just 3.5 pounds, the boot packs an astounding amount of warmth.

And unlike the leather single Best Mountaineering Boots in this round-up, which come up a little higher on the shin, this synthetic technical boot stops just above the ankle. This fit not only lightens it up but also allows for more ankle articulation for precision placements on the ice and mixed pitches.

Like the bigger boots in Scarpa’s Phantom line, the wrap-around zipper can take a little time to understand. Regarding competitors, the Phantom Tech is similar to the Arc’teryxAcrux AR and La Sportiva G5 in warmth, weight, and features.

Scarpa Phantom Tech

The G5, however, does not have a waterproof zipper, which can make a big difference on approaches where you have to splash across creeks or on warm days when snow and ice take on a wetter quality.

Accordingly, Scarpa wisely put a waterproof zipper on every boot in their Phantom line. For a technical climbing boot that is warm, durable. And performs exceptionally well on steep terrain, the Phantom Tech is the best choice.

La SportivaBaruntse

Group: 4-season technical alpine
Color: Multiple

The Baruntse is the most durable double boot in La Sportiva’s lineup. Compared to ultra-modern double boots like the Scarpa Phantom 6000 and La SportivaSpantik and G2 SM, the Baruntse doesn’t offer the shiny features and high-tech designs that win gear awards. Instead, it is constructed to take a beating on steep ice and cold mountains and still get the job done.

And the boot may not be quite as warm as the models above. But it’s Alaska-tested and remains a favorite for technical ascents in the Ruth Gorge, and high altitude suffer fests on Denali, Aconcagua, and beyond (if climbing early season on Denali, you may want to consider adding a Forty Below Purple Haze overboot for extra warmth).

The La SportivaBaruntse is relatively inexpensive compared to other double boots. But for the price, you get beefy soles that you can resolve. Also, rubber rands, stout crampon welts.

Moreover, it comes with metallic gussets and eyelets, all of which should stand up to years of abuse. This fact does come at a weight penalty. The Baruntse is one of the more massive boots on this list at over 5.5 pounds.

La SportivaBaruntse

Regarding fit, the toe box of the liner is a little roomier than La Sportiva’s technical rock-shoe-like fit. This fact is for those with wide feet who would typically tend toward a Scarpa or Lowa.

Also, it’s worth noting that the 7mm thermo-moldable EVA foam liner allows for custom fitting. Some people retrofit this boot with a thicker and even warmer Intuition Denali or Logan liner, which takes up an additional room and provides an incredible custom fit for your boot once heat molded.

Scarpa Phantom 8000

Group: Extreme cold/high altitude
Color: Multiple

The Phantom 8000 is the durable workhorse of Scarpa’s extreme cold mountaineering line. From the ground up, Scarpa designed a serious boot here: an insulated Schoeller upper shell keeps elements out of the boot, while a thermo-moldable liner with a simple pull-down speed lace keeps your foot tight and toasty.

More, the Vibram Zero Gravity Lite sole can stand up to the abuse of kicking up a screen, unlike the La SportivaOly Mons. Take this into account if you’re climbing a mountain like Aconcagua.

Also, zippers are always a cause for concern—it only makes one misstep with sharp crampons to shred a zipper—but Scarpa’s method of putting them on the outside of the foot should help alleviate that issue.

Why the middle-of-the-pack ranking for the Scarpa Phantom 8000? It’s true that the La SportivaOly Mons is slightly more massive at over 6 pounds for the pair. And it’s also true that its sole isn’t as durable as the Phantom’s.

Scarpa Phantom 8000

But the Phantom 8000 is the most expensive mountaineering boot on this list. And we’re not sure if the extra cash is worth the premium sole. As a boot of this caliber will almost always use with a crampon.

But one potential selling point is fit: the Scarpa has a slightly more generous toe box than the La Sportiva, which is excellent for those with wide feet.

Lowa Mountain Expert GTX Evo

Classification: Lightweight mountaineering
Color: Multiple

The Lowa Mountain Expert GTX Evo could be considered a classic, and we don’t mean that negatively. Other boots in its class shed weight by using lighter materials, often at the expense of durability and a high price tag.

New features and technological advances are significant. But sometimes you want something that is hard to kill and can get the job done. Without sporting features like built-in gaiters, fancy lacing systems, or ultralight foam rands and insulation, the Mountain Expert GTX Evo is an excellent do-all lightweight mountaineering boot.

Although the Lowa isn’t the absolute lightest of the full step-in crampon-compatible single boots listed here, we feel that the benefits of durability, warmth. And a very reasonable price make it an excellent choice for a wide range of activities from basic mountaineering to technical ice and mixed climbing.

Lowa Mountain Expert GTX Evo

Not only can the Mountain Expert GTX Evo take a beating, but its stiffness underfoot—while still allowing for ankle articulation—make it ideal for steep ice and precision footwork on hairy mixed leads. You do get slightly less rocker than other boots in the lightweight category. But we like the price and performance overall.

La Sportiva G2 SM

Category: 4-season technical alpine
Color: Multiple

The G2 SM was a radical shift in the lineup of La Sportiva dual boots, shaving an impressive eight ounces per boot from the already light and technically charged Spantik (the G2 SM did not replace the Spantik. But was introduced several years later as an ultralight and even warmer alternative).

La Sportiva went with a dual Boa lacing system (one on the ankle to secure the foot and another on the shin), which allows for quick tightening and adjustments without dealing with tying laces in the extreme cold. And the built-in super gator keeps your inner boot dry and toasty.

In contrast to the Spantik, the G2 SM is warmer but not nearly as stiff or technical feeling. Even when tightened down, it has a lot more forward flex than the Spantik. This fact, along with a more full toe box, takes away from the precision fit needed for mixed climbing.

La Sportiva G2 SM

And regarding durability, the G2 SM seems to be slightly less durable than the Spantik or Scarpa Phantom 6000 though neither boot can match its light weight. Overall, the G2 SM excels at cold and high altitude mountaineering on 5,000 to 7,000-meter peaks. And is still perfectly capable of climbing highly technical terrain. If weight savings and warmth are your main concerns, the G2 SM will not disappoint.

Scarpa Mont Blanc Pro GTX

Group: 4-season technical alpine
Color: Multiple

This Scarpa Mont Blanc Pro GTX is a jack of all trades mountaineering boot—it walks well due to the medium rocker (comparable to the Nepal Cube GTX and Lowa Weisshorn GTX), climbs ice well due to the stiffness underfoot and upper boot.

Moreover, is warm enough for all-season technical climbing and mountaineering. And, it’s a go-to boot for guides on Mount Rainier. But unlike the Nepal Cube GTX, the Mont Blanc Pro GTX lacing system lacks the clamp-down eyelet at the midpoint, a nice feature when you want to keep the lower foot tight but the ankle loses for walking.

Best Mountaineering Boots

In spite of all of the features, it’s the durable design of the Mont Blanc Pro GTX that drew us in. From the top down, the boot is of sturdy fabrics with a minimized profile that doesn’t skimp on functionality.

An elastic gator snaps shut with two buttons and stay tight around the calf. And you can move a fixed adjustable inner tongue up or down to obtain a comfortable fit. Somewhat similar to the removable tongue on the Nepal Cube GTX. That fits on the shape of your foot. Simply put, if the Mont Blanc Pro GTX fits, it will get you up summits and not fall apart on the way back down.

Best Mountaineering Boots

Janice Kerney
 

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